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Using Globalization Pipeline from IBM DevOps Delivery Pipeline on Bluemix


In this blog post I am going to show how to quickly translate a WebSphere Liberty application on Bluemix using the Globalization Pipeline service from within the IBM DevOps Services Delivery Pipeline. The best part about doing this is that the whole task of translating your Java property files will be completely automated for you. The only thing that you will need to do is simply specify that you want your property files translated from IBM DevOps Services Delivery Pipeline.

If you need more information on IBM DevOps and Delivery Pipeline, then check out these tutorials Intro to IBM DevOps Services. The aim of this post is to show how you can use the Globalization Pipeline service job type from IBM DevOps Services to rapidly translate your content through Globalization Pipeline.

To get started make sure you have configured your Bluemix Java WebSphere Liberty application to be built in IBM DevOps Services. In our example we are using Maven to build our application and then having IBM DevOps Services automatically deploy the application to Bluemix. Here is a screenshot that shows a typical type of build and deploy configuration for Liberty applications in IBM DevOps Services.

IBM DevOps Liberty Build and Deploy

IBM DevOps Build and Deploy

In order for us to use the Globalization Pipeline service from IBM DevOps services we need to make sure that we have properly named our Java property file that contains the strings that we want to translate. To ensure that your file will be automatically detected by IBM DevOps Services the base file name must contain the “_en” language code. In our example the name of our property file is trains_en.properties.  To automatically have this file translated for you do the following:

  1. Click on Configure Stage from your Build stage.
    Configure Stage

    Configure Stage

     

  2. Add a new Build job type.
    Build Job Type

    Build Job Type

     

  3. Select IBM Globalization Pipeline for the builder and name it Globalization.
    Globalization Builder

    Globalization Builder

     

  4. Fill in the name of your property file and select a name for the bundle. You also need to indicate whether or not you would like to have an instance of the Globalization Pipeline service created for you. If you already have an existing instance of the service in your Bluemix org and space, then you don’t need to create another. If you don’t have an instance already created, then indicate that you would like to have one created for you. In this example, the name of my property file is trains_en.properties and the bundle name I am using is trains. I also already have an instance of the Globalization Pipeline service in my org and space so I don’t need to create another one.
    Globalization Pipeline Settings

    Globalization Pipeline Settings

     

  5. Return to your Build stage and now run it.
    Run Build Stage

    Run Build Stage

     

  6. Check the log files and verify that your file was translated.

    Translation Log

    Translation Log

At this point you have successfully translated your Java property file and automatically assembled the translated versions into your build so now you are ready to have users come and checkout your application in other languages. You can also invite language experts to check the translations for consistency and grant them access to your translations in the Globalization Pipeline so they can make edits for you. I hope this post has helped you get going with using the Globalization Pipeline service from IBM DevOps Services.

  1. Rajesh

    A very nice feature of G11n pipeline service.
    A clarification though.

    Is this limited to few file types(like Java properties) and single file in a Bluemix applicaton or it can be customized to support more file types and a set of files those can be translated on the fly during build process?

  2. thank you for sharing nice information really very nice .salesforce training

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